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Move over Ripley, exo-skeleton technology has developed from alien-slaying to everyday use on the workshop floor. 

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Industrial exoskeletons fortify frail flesh and bone with steel frames and actuators, augmenting humans to the point where the advantages of a robotic workforce aren’t so clear. And now there’s one that’s as affordable as it is easy to move in.

Earlier this year, California-based suitX announced what it claimed was the world's most affordable mobility exoskeleton, the Phoenix. Designed for disabled users, it utilizes motors to move their legs for them.

SuitX, the company behind a medical exoskeleton called Phoenix, has just announced a new modular option called MAX, or the Modular Agile Exoskeleton.

Ostensibly, the suitX MAX looks like something out of a futuristic science-fiction film -- a powerful mechanic suit that increases one's strength and agility. In reality, the suitX MAX isn't far off from that imagining, although the tool's purpose is somewhat more pragmatic in scope.

Robotics startup suitX is turning human laborers into bionic workers with a new modular, full-body exoskeleton that will help reduce the number of on-the-job injuries.

The future world could look very different if all of these technologies become a reality.

Exoskeleton

A company called suitX has created a mobility exoskeleton that’s designed for disabled users.

Artificial Intelligence hasn’t taken over the labor market, yet. It’s in unstructured workspaces where human laborers will continue to thrive, explained Dr. Homayoon Karerooni, founder and CEO of suiX.