News

Today on In Case You Missed It: Between Snap Inc.'s more-buzz-than-Google-Glass sunglasses and exoskeleton suits for the workplace, we are officially future-living. Spectacles cost $130 and are dispensing in randomly placed vending machines.

Modular Exoskeleton Aims to Reduce Workplace Injuries
SuitX, a robotics company based out of Berkeley’s Human Engineering Lab, has launched a new exoskeleton, the Max, that aims to augment human capabilities while at the same time protecting users from common workplace injuries.

EMERYVILLE, Calif. (KGO) --
Powered exoskeletons promise to help people who've lost their mobility walk again.

Versatile, low-cost bionics can reduce muscle strain and prevent injuries across multiple industries.

Based on UC Berkeley engineering research, MAX (Modular Agile Exoskeleton) combines back, shoulder and leg components to form the only passive industrial exoskeleton currently available

Ergonomic design for office workers has been around for decades. These exoskeletal devices aim to bring the idea to industrial workers.

“Heavy lifting” will become an anachronism if one robotics company has its way.

Robotics startup suitX is turning human laborers into bionic workers with a new modular, full-body exoskeleton that will help reduce the number of on-the-job injuries.

Ever wanted strap yourself into a robot exoskeleton and gain extraordinary powers? The SuitX MAX, a three-part exoskeleton launched Wednesday, promises to do just that.